Goudoubo

Participants Feedy, age 15, and Kawela, age 18, in front of the Peaceful Cohabitation Mural.  They met in the program and became friends though they came from very different backgrounds, Feedy, a white Touareg grew up in the capital of Mali, Bamako, and had 8 years of classic education, while Kawela, a black Touareg came from a small town and had 2 years of classic education and 2 years of Koranic education. Goudoubo Refugee Camp, Burkina Faso, June 2014.  As part of introductory meetings with community leaders, Project Director Christina Mallie and Social Worker Laurie Reyman meet with the leader of Bloc B, front and center, Mohamed Ag Almahadi, to gain community support for the project.  Mohamed, with 20 other bloc leaders, formed a community arts council to guide the project that also included women and youth leaders.  Goudoubo Refugee Camp, Burkina Faso, March, 2014. Issa, age 17 in front of the Education Mural, Goudoubo Refugee Camp, Burkina Faso, June 2014.  A Peul participant, he said that the because of the project he no longer feels afraid of interacting with the other ethnicities, namely the Touareg who make up over 90% of the camp population.  The Education Mural, created by the youth of Goudoubo, at the Central Office, Goudoubo Refugee Camp, Burkina Faso, June 2014.  Fati, age 16, write her name with her favorite color on the almost completed Education Mural.  For participants including Fati who didn’t know how to write, the letters of their names were traced in pencil on the wall and they then used the lines as a guide to paint, Goudoubo Refugee Camp, Burkina Faso, June 2014. Participants painting the Education Mural together, Goudoubo Refugee Camp, Burkina Faso, June 2014.   Social Worker Laurie Reyman holds a discussion with one group of participants after they completed a body mapping exercise. The discussion centered around how the body is affected by war and things the body can do to create peace, Goudoubo Refugee Camp, Burkina Faso, June, 2014.  From left to right:  Bintou and Gidatta, both age 16 wash brushes to help clean up.  Neither had been to school before and so they often volunteered to help out in the ways they knew best, Goudoubo Refugee Camp, Burkina Faso, June 2014. Almoubarak, age 12, painting on the Peaceful Cohabitation Mural, Goudoubo Refugee Camp, Burkina Faso, June 2014. Some examples of the many camel drawings that were made during the recruitment phase for project assistants and youth participants in the camp. Goudoubo Refugee Camp, Burkina Faso, March, 2014. A self-portrait exercise designed for the apprehensive drawer, this is a self portrait of Sagda, age 14, created from a black and white photo of her decorated with crayons and sequins, Goudoubo Refugee Camp, Burkina Faso, April 2014.  During recruitment for the project a black touareg youth, also known as a bella makes a drawing to submit for the application while her white touareg foster father watches.  Like many other youth in the camp population she didn’t have a background in western education, and drawing with a pencil was difficult for her. Unfortunately even though she was considered a vulnerable youth and because of this was selected as a participant for the project, she did not attend.  It is possible her foster father did not want her to be a part of the project, or that she chose not to, Goudoubo Refugee Camp, Burkina Faso, March 2014.

  • About This Project

    Following the success of our project in Mentao Refugee Camp, we received funding to execute a similar project in Goudoubo, a refugee camp that is home to approximately 10,500 Malian refugees who have fled from Touareg rebels and Islamic extremists, who have been creating a violent and unsafe situation for the people living in northern Mali since early 2012.

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    Energizing a Refugee Community Through Art
    Goudoubo Refugee Camp, Burkina Faso
    March 2014 – June 2014

    Colors of Connection, in partnership with the Save the Children, targeted 36 out-of-school youth aged 12-18 to create two murals in public spaces in Goudoubo. This project was designed to promote greater tolerance amongst the different ethnic groups in the camp, a more vibrant civil society, portrayal of culture, and self-awareness.

    Because of additional support to this project provided by Laurie Reyman, Colors of Connection’s Organizational Development Director and a trained social worker, this project added components of addressing the deeper psychosocial needs of the youth and the community, as well as lessons on conflict resolution and non-violent communication for the participants.

    Under the guidance of the Project Director, Christina Mallie, and a community arts council made up of a group of interested community leaders, youth coming from three different ethnic groups in the camp: Touareg, Arab and Peul, designed and painted two murals on the walls of two schools in the camp over the course of nine weeks.  The youth transformed these public spaces into positive visualizations of their hopes for themselves and their communities, while learning valuable skills in the use of the arts.  The two themes identified by the community leaders for the murals were Education and Peaceful-Cohabitation, reflecting their hopes and dreams for their communities.

  • Multimedia

    Goudoubo Project Photos
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    Goudoubo Project Video
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